2015 Beckman Scholar – Brooke Versaw

A female student with dark hair and glasses, wearing a white shirt.
2015 Beckman Scholar Brooke Versaw ’18

Chemistry major Brooke Versaw ’18 from College Station, Texas, is the second of our three new Beckman Scholars from Texas A&M University. Versaw impressed the faculty, staff, and student application reviewers and interview panel with the breadth and depth of her experiences, her outstanding writing skills, and articulate, well-spoken answers. Versaw’s description of herself as “curious” and “persistent” was amply demonstrated by her ability to articulately discuss a variety of subjects from ethics to electric cars.

Versaw is a University Honors Program freshman and was chosen to be a Sophomore Advisor for the coming academic year for the Honors Housing Community. Her application for this leadership position emphasized rational thought, role modeling, and imaginative ideas to help create a sense of community between the two freshman Honors dorms. Versaw also spent her freshman year as a member of the TAMU Honor Council, which hears issues with respect to the Aggie Honor Code, the Student Affiliate chapter of the American Chemical Society and as a National Aggie Scholar Ambassador.

Versaw got an early start in research, well before matriculating at Texas A&M in fall 2014.  She spent the summer of 2013 as a Robert A. Welch Foundation Chemistry Scholar with Dr. Junha Jeon at the University of Texas at Arlington investigating the mechanism of alkenyl silyl ether hydrolyzation. The following summer Versaw moved to Dr. Steve Lockless’ group in the Department of Biology at Texas A&M to study intracellular signaling using synthetic models of cellular membranes. Versaw’s interest in chemistry and chemical research was evident as early as high school, where she volunteered as a chemistry and physics tutor.

In June, Versaw will begin as a Beckman Scholar in the laboratory of Dr. Karen Wooley on a research project using organic synthesis and polymerization strategies to build macromolecular structures that can be used to develop new materials.

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